TDKR Update on Plot and Bane!

the news.... rises! Views from Nolan, Bale, Hardy on why Bane is such a good villain!...

Written by ronin
Published about over 3 years ago. Filed Under: Movies

I have been avoiding all batman news as too often they are just set pics or further spoilers that simply spoil (surprise) the movie.

But this latest bit of news (courtesy of Empire magazine) is different as we now know what to expect from the movie without all the twists and turns. Plus it is direct from Nolan's mouth who is a genius when it comes to story telling and building up hype without giving too much away.

Most surprisingly, the movie is set 8 years after the The Dark Knight which may be a nod to Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns a comic that featured an older Batman who is no longer in his prime but returns out of necessity. And to really test him, they have chosen a villain that will test him physically as well as mentally - Bane, famous for breaking Batman's back.

Nolan has effectively taken core elements of some of Batman's most iconic comics, so it would make sense that he is doing it here. It all sounds rather exciting, especially they way he, Bale and Nolan describe the match up. Check out the key extracts below and see for yourself. Again thanks for Empire for this!

Christopher Nolan Talks About The Prologue & More!

Our story picks up EIGHT years after The Dark Knight. In terms of finishing our story and increasing its scope, we were trying to craft an epic....It's really all about finishing Batman and Bruce Wayne's story. We left him in a very precarious place. Perhaps surprisingly for some people, our story picks up quite a bit later, eight years after The Dark Knight. So he's an older Bruce Wayne; he's not in a great state. With our choice of villain and with our choice of story we are testing Batman both physically as well as mentally. Also, in terms of finishing the our story and increasing its scope, we were trying to craft epic so the physicality of the film became very important.

Nolan On Bane:

The Prologue is basically the first six, seven minutes of the film. Its the introduction to Bane and a taste of the rest of the film. With Bane we are looking to give Batman a physical challenge that he hasn't had before. He's a great sort of movie monster, but with an incredible brain, and that was a side of him that hand't been taped before. Because the stories from the comics are very epic and very evocative---very much in the way that Bruce Wayne's origin story is epic and evocative. We were looking to really parallel that with our choice of villain. So he's a worthy adversary. I felt that if I could get somebody as talented as Tom to agree to hide himself in the character I would get something very special. What I really feel with a great actor is every movement, every hand gesture, every step, has performance in it. Tom completely got it. It's an incredible challenge to remove motion of the face so that you can't put things across in the usual way, and you just have the eyes and a bit of the scalp and the arms and legs. What I knew is that from Tom I would get something where you get a total character and everything has incredible thought applied to it. And a lot of what he's doing is very counterintuitive. He has this incredible disjunct between the expressiveness of the voice and the stillness of the movement of his body. He's found a way to play a character who is enormous and powerful with a sort of calm to it, but also is able to incredibly fast at times. Unpredictable. He just has a raw threat to him that's extraordinary. It's a very powerful thing when you see it come together, beyond what I have ever imagined. That's what you get from working with great actors.

"The Riddler was never a contender". - Hardy was Nolan's first choice!

The world of Batman indeed the world of all graphic novels, deals with archetypes, and there's a very real sense in which the Joker is an extreme and an absolute. So when you're looking to continue the story, then you certainly don't want a watered-down version of a character you've already done. You want a different archetype. What Bane represents in the comics is the ultimate physical enemy.

The world of Batman, indeed the world of all graphic novels, deals with archetypes...And there's a very real sense in which The Joker is an extreme and an absolute and Batman is an extreme and an absolute. So when you're looking to continue the story - in this case finish Bruce Wayne and Batman's story, as we see it - then you certainly don't want a watered-down version of a character you've already done. You want a different archetype. What Bane represents in the comics is the ultimate physical villain.

The end of Batman's story

It's really all about finishing Batman's and Bruce Wayne's story. We left him in a very precarious place at the end of The Dark Knight. His reputation in tatters, on the run. And I think perhaps surprisingly for some people, out story picks up quite a bit later. He's not in great state. He's frozen in time, he's hit a brick wall. Batman Begins was very much about the explaining the logic of the suit, and how it belonged in the shadows, in a position of stealth where he's able to intimidate people with it as his new entity. And then through The Dark Knight we would him out during the magic hour and we changed the suit accordingly so he withstood that kind of exposure. But also the character himself has the reputation now, so he;s able to expose himself more and still intimidate people. And with the third film we're pushing that further...but plenty of it takes place in the dark too.

Lindy Hemming (costume designer) also gave some Details On Bane's Mask:

THE BREATHING MECHINISM: "He was injured early in his story. Hes suffering from pain and he needs gas to survive. He cannot survive the pain without the mask. The pipes from the mask go back along his jawline and feed into the thing at the back where there are two cannisters of what ever it is..the anasthetic"

Tom Hardy On Bane:

He's brutal. Brutal. He's a big dude who's incredibly clinical, in the fact that he has a result-based and oriented fighting style. It's not about fighting. It's about carnage. The style is heavy-handed, heavy-footed, it's nasty. Anything from small-joint manipulation to crushing skulls, crushing rib cages, stamping on shins and knees and necks and collarbones and snapping heads off and tearing his fists through chests, ripping out spinal columns. He is a terrorist in mentality as well as brutal action. He's a smashing machine. He's a wrecking ball. If we're going to shoot somebody, shoot the pregnant woman or the old lady first. Make sure everybody stands up. He's a terrorist in his mentality as well as brutal actions. He's horrible piece of work.

Christian Bale on Bane:

I wasn't familiar with Bane. Although I vaguely remembered just a crazy "roid-looking" guy with a mask. You know what I mean? I remember him less actually on screen, and more people telling me that, and wincing just like you did. I just trust and have faith in Chris I know he wasn't gonna mess around with making poor decision on the bloody villain was!


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